All posts by William Davis

The Best Online Games for PC (Part I)

Fortnite and PUBG are popular games that you can play on your PC.

Online games are good since you can play them on your old laptop or a new gaming PC. So, if you have been searching for the best online games for PC, you are in the right place. Here is our list of the best online games you can play on your PC right now. We have included both free and paid games. Even if you don’t want to spend any money on gaming, that’s okay. 

PUBG

PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, also well known as PUBG, is the most popular and largest battle royale game in the industry. There are many great battle royale games, but PUBG has remained at the top. It has great gameplay elements that are very addictive. Also, it’s one of the top online PC games you can play right now.

This game concentrates solely on big-scale survival gameplay. You are stuck on a big island where you must begin searching for loot. This includes shelter, clothes, weapons, etc. You can make alliances on the island but be warned that anyone can kill you and loot your resources. So, go around looking for loot and begin killing folks that aren’t nice to you. 

Fortnite

Another online game you can play on your PC, Fortnite is a huge survival co-op game that has a fantastic battle royale mode. If you enjoy battle royales and want to play with other folks on a wide open-world where everyone is out to get each other then Fortnite is truly the best game for you. 

Fortnite is complete with amazing action and colorful characters that are really over-the-top. Also, you can play the Players vs Environment mode where you get to unite with other players and go against your enemies.

It’s like an ideal mix of Minecraft’s resource gathering and PUBG’s survival-based gameplay. If you want to have fun with a lighthearted survival co-op game then Fortnite is the right game.

Best Board Games (Part V)

These games are fun for people of every age.

PHOTOSYNTHESIS

Take a stand as Mother Nature, battling with other players to plant trees of your color in the top spots in the forest, where they’ll get the most light. Not only does the arboreal theme make this game appear incredibly beautiful. The 3D trees will entice anyone into playing. The fact that every player’s trees are a dissimilar shape and color helps colorblind players.

At the beginning of the game, you’ll put two small trees in places close to the edge of the hexagonal board. You’ll also put the big sun token near two sides of the board. The sun’s light beams in straightforward lines across the board from the token. If your trees get touched by it, you receive light points that you can spend growing your existing trees or plant more.

The issue? If your tree is behind someone else’s, the sun can’t get to it, so you’ll receive fewer light points that turn. The larger the tree, the lengthier the shadow it casts. When the sun goes around the board three times (18 rounds), the game is over.

JAIPUR

Jaipur is made just for two players, and it pits you against each other by creating an almost Prisoner’s Dilemma-like system where you have to determine whether to go for quality or speed. It’s a trading game: there are cards in the middle of the table you can pick up. If you collect enough matching-color cards, you can swap them for tokens with points values on.

Some color tokens are worth way more than others. So, do you both vie for the same high-value stuff or do you go for a good number of the lower-value cards your opponent is disregarding?

Even apparently simple wins can be tough decisions. There are just five cards in the middle of the table to take from at any time. If three greens come out, you may feel that’s a bonus for you. However, those three will be replaced with something as soon as you take them. What if something more valued appears that you leave open to the other player? Decisions, decisions, decisions…

Best Board Games (Part IV)

These games are great to play with family and friends. 

WELCOME TO 

Welcome To is a game about town planning, somewhat. Truthfully, the homes have already been constructed and you’re just completing them. You have to number houses on some streets using numbers that are pulled from decks of cards. You pick from one of three digits every turn.

Once the turn is done, new cards are turned over, with new actions that they’re unintentionally paired with. Each time you play, some scoring goals are varied. There are plenty of ways to go for points, so even though everyone is writing on their own personal pad from the same sets of cards in the middle, you all end up making your own fun puzzle to solve later on. Though, it depends on what you do at the beginning.

It’s a very easy game that doesn’t take long to play. The scoring system is difficult enough that younger kids might miss their distinctions. You don’t have anything to do with other players in this game. Your discussions will be more about commiseration of how you’ve all were able to get stuck in a cul de sac. And it plays with any number of players. All that’s needed is a sheet of paper and a pen.

FLAMME ROUGE

Flamme Rouge is a game of bicycle racing. Every player has two riders in a team, and the goal is to get just one of them over the finish line before your opponents. Along the way, you’re competing for the best position for your riders, but that spot isn’t really the first place.

Just like real bike racing, Flamme Rouge urges you to create a pack. If you’re in front, your rider will get more tired. If you’re behind someone else, you’ll have a simpler ride by being in their slipstream. So, in a dream race, you’ll be 2nd the whole way, until the last turn, when you’ll break out into the lead.

You get good assortment from the box. The track is modular and assorted variations add hills, which significantly change what cards you’ll desire to play. It has loads of track suggestions in the box, but there’s also an app for creating and sharing your own, as well as finding ones others have constructed.

 

Best Board Games (Part III)

These board games are the best for family nights.

PANDEMIC LEGACY: SEASON 1

Pandemic is a game of attempting to stop disease outbreaks all over the world. On a player’s turn, you have to use your actions to go around locations building research stations, treating diseases, and acquiring the cures that will win you the game. However, with only four actions per turn, you can’t do much on your own and each turn puts more diseases on the board, if too much happens in one city, it spreads to all places close by, putting you closer to losing the game.

Therefore, you and the other players have to come together to plan ahead, triaging the place where the danger is now, and what’s susceptible in the future. Who can come to Beijing the quickest to handle the situation there? Should you save Madrid next turn or concentrate on finding another cure?

A big part of the charm of Pandemic Legacy is that it keeps amazing you with changes to how things play. The diseases get difficult, you get new ways to respond to them, you’ll have to build new kinds of buildings, you’ll get new kinds of objectives, and the game will even use your own decisions against you. There’s no experience like it for a group to get together and share.

BEASTS OF BALANCE

This high-tech game uses an app to request that you balance bad-shaped 3D creatures on top of every other on a special base without them falling over. The system uses NFC to realize which piece you’ve placed, so there’s no pulling to wool over its eyes. It’s similar to a reverse Jenga, but without the nice security of the objects all being a uniform shape.

You can play the game in a couple of various modes. An option is to attempt to get the most points you can by putting animals, then crossbreeding them into strange new creatures. Or, using power-ups to produce high-scores or putting in distractions like the need to have one hand on the touchscreen while placing a creature, so your control is reduced, but you receive more points.

 

PANDEMIC LEGACY: SEASON 1

Pandemic is a game of attempting to stop disease outbreaks all over the world. On a player’s turn, you have to use your actions to go around locations building research stations, treating diseases, and acquiring the cures that will win you the game. However, with only four actions per turn, you can’t do much on your own and each turn puts more diseases on the board, if too much happens in one city, it spreads to all places close by, putting you closer to losing the game.

Therefore, you and the other players have to come together to plan ahead, triaging the place where the danger is now, and what’s susceptible in the future. Who can come to Beijing the quickest to handle the situation there? Should you save Madrid next turn or concentrate on finding another cure?

A big part of the charm of Pandemic Legacy is that it keeps amazing you with changes to how things play. The diseases get difficult, you get new ways to respond to them, you’ll have to build new kinds of buildings, you’ll get new kinds of objectives, and the game will even use your own decisions against you. There’s no experience like it for a group to get together and share.

BEASTS OF BALANCE

This high-tech game uses an app to request that you balance bad-shaped 3D creatures on top of every other on a special base without them falling over. The system uses NFC to realize which piece you’ve placed, so there’s no pulling to wool over its eyes. It’s similar to a reverse Jenga, but without the nice security of the objects all being a uniform shape.

You can play the game in a couple of various modes. An option is to attempt to get the most points you can by putting animals, then crossbreeding them into strange new creatures. Or, using power-ups to produce high-scores or putting in distractions like the need to have one hand on the touchscreen while placing a creature, so your control is reduced, but you receive more points.

 

Best Board Games (Part II)

These board games will keep you bus.y having fun.

COSMIC ENCOUNTER

It’s said that Cosmic Encounter is the equivalent board game of Mario Kart. Practice makes you better at it. Though just enough crazy stuff happens in every game that a beginner often has a chance of winning, which makes it fun for both first-time players and veterans.

The rules are very simple: each turn, a player is matched with another player and the two must either fight (using numbered cards in their hands) or bargain. They can invite other players to align with them in the fight, in a trade for rewards. The aim is to be the first to possess five colonies on other players’ planets, either by good negotiations or winning battles. It’s a very easy set of rules to learn.

The wrinkle is that each player has a distinct alien power that completely breaks those rules. One alien actually wins battles if it loses them. Another alien gets to take other players’ thrown away battle cards, getting more powerful the more others use their top cards.

One can just welcome itself into others’ encounters as a partner even if they don’t want it. Another wins the entire game if it loses all of its ships, meaning no one knows whether you’re going to try to win or lose on purpose any given battle.

SPLENDOR

For a light and small board game that has plenty of strategies to play again and again, while also not being threatening to new players, Splendor is a perfect choice.

It’s a game of purchasing cards by paying a price in gems of various colors. Each card you purchase gives you more gems you can use to purchase cards more simply, so everything snowballs pleasingly as you play. The only way to get the higher-value cards is to have a good suite of other cards in front of you.

Some cards have points values and when someone gets 15 points, the game ends that round, though other players have an opportunity to purchase one last card which could net them even more points.

Best Board Games (Part I)

These games have grown in popularity over the past few years. 

In the last 10 years, tabletop games have grown in popularity. But the best board games are nothing like your old game of Monopoly. Instead, a new wave of games uses creative ideas and engaging themes to give you a very good time with your family and friends.

One of the biggest reasons they’ve taken off so much is that they give folks a focus for coming together in one place and taking pleasure in each other’s company in a time when so much of our social lives take place on social media.

But to be sure that folks are always having fun and loving to get together often, you’ll want to be sure you’re bringing the perfect board games for your group to the table.

With this in mind, below are the best board game choices.

QUACKS OF QUEDLINBURG

Though its name might be needlessly complex, Quacks is simple to teach and simple to play. Most of the game entails reaching into a bag of tokens and then reveling in the ecstasy or agony of what you’ve drawn. Particularly since it was you who determined which tokens went in there.

The concept is that you’re all fake potion makers, creating a brew using the ingredients discovered in your bag. You reach in, get a token, take it out and put it in your ‘pot’, which is really a score track. Pull out top-quality ingredients and you’ll go along the track more rapidly, providing you with more points at the end of the round. You’re all doing this together, watching each other’s success as you go.

You’ll unavoidably find yourself playing Russian Roulette with your bag. You’ve pulled plenty of cherry bombs, and if you draw the one left in your bag you’ll blow. But you know there are five other tokens in your bag too. You’ll receive a nice bonus if can go a little further up the track. Feeling lucky?

 

Top Kid Drones (Part IV)

These drones are great for beginner pilots.

AIR HOGS STAR WARS: RC ULTIMATE MILLENNIUM FALCON QUAD

Your child will be the coolest kid in the neighborhood when this drone comes out to play. You can fly it over 150 feet away and it can do some amazing stunt tricks with just a press of a button.

The best things are the sound effects and LED lights. It’s crafted from high-density foam, meaning it can handle some crash landings. The only complaint is the short battery life which is pretty much the reality with drones anyway. It is quite certain that the Millenium Falcon will be a huge hit.

HOLY STONE HS177 BATTLE DRONE

Holy Stone make good drones for beginner pilots, and the HS177 is no exception. It has three-speed modes to use as your piloting skills develop and Attitude Hold denotes the drone will remain in the air if you take your hands off the controls.

Once you’ve learned solo flight, team up with another HS177 owner and you can participate in aerial combat. Shoot your opponent with the drone’s infrared laser four times and their drone will fall from the sky (yes, safely and slowly).

This drone has a scope of between 30 and 50 meters from the controller. So, you have room to practice flight paths, maneuvers, and explore the drone’s stunt abilities.

HUBSAN NANO Q4 SE QUADCOPTER

If space is a problem and your child is just going to be flying indoors, check out Hubsan’s little, lightweight Q4 SE Nano drone. The quadcopter is stored in the controller itself, making it a neat and tiny package.

A stabilization system holds the pocket-sized flyer stable in the air. Flip and roll tricks can be done simply by squeezing down on the controller’s throttle stick.

Flight time might be limited to only three minutes. However, the Nano Q4 SE charges in only 30 minutes so the drone will be quick to return to the skies.

 

Top Kid Drones (Part II)

These drones are built for more than just flying.

Some of the top drones for kids are crafted for more than just flying. Take a look at the stunt-tastic JoyGeek Mini Drone, for instance, or the laser-equipped Holy Stone HS177 battle drone, a solid bit of added entertainment to keep your children occupied.

The more you spend, the more extra features you’ll unlock, like an onboard camera, the capability to beam a first-person camera view to your cell, and crush-proof construction.

There are many children drones to pick from, but the brands in this guide, like Hubsan, UDI and Holy Stone, have a good reputation in terms of performance, dependability and build-in quality.

THE BEST KIDS DRONES

ALTAIR AA108

If your kid has been looking at your drone with hungry eyes, but you’re worried about letting them loose on such a commanding machine, the AA108 packs high-end styling but with sufficient features to be sure it’s a safe and fun drone for learning the basics.

One-touch take-off and landing take the stress out of being airborne, and headless and altitude hold modes mean the drone won’t fall out of the sky or accidentally fly out of range. Fixed propeller guards are on hand to safeguard surroundings and people.

The AA108 is a drone to grow with. The FlyingSee companion app presents new pilots to custom flight paths. You can send the drone mechanically along a particular route traced on your smartphone screen.

HOLY STONE DEERC170 PREDATOR MINI RC QUADCOPTER

One of the main issues for kids, when they begin to fly drones, is control. Fundamentally understanding how the controls flip depend on if the drone is coming back or going away from them.

The Holy Stone DEERC170 Predator has some intelligent technology that repairs the drone’s controls to the controller instead of the head of the drone. This headless mode means the controller will always be left on the drone regardless of which direction it’s pointing.

Top Kid Drones (Part III)

These drones are the perfect window to enjoyment for your children.

SYMA X5C DRONE

It takes time to learn the controls of a drone. While several drones are crafted to be kid-friendly, the Syma X5C takes it one step further with a convenient slow mode.

Once switched, the mighty built-in 6-axis keeps the drone steady in the air letting anyone take control of the flight without worry that this drone will go off into the distance.

As well as the easy to use flight modes, there’s a built-in camera that lets you get a POV perspective from the drone itself.

UDI RC U27

With its three modes, novices can learn well within their means. Mode 1 offers maximum stability while they become skilled. They can go to Mode 2 for medium speed and Mode 3 for all its bells, tricks, and whistles.

Headless Mode, which is really a help, not a deterrent, means no adjustment to the aircraft is needed before flying. This makes it even easier for beginners to grasp the basics. Add the fact that it’s got fabulous flashy lights and you have a massive, long-term hit.

JOYGEEK MINI DRONE

The Joygeek Mini Drone is one of the toughest and smallest UAVs on this list, making it extremely portable and suspect to falter in the likelihood of a crash.

To make life simpler on new pilots, only a single button push is needed to bring the drone into the land, and a built-in positioning system helps things remain steady in the air, bettering control. The drone also has low and high-speed modes so you can begin slowly as you learn to do basic controls.

Once you’ve got your pilot’s wings, there are several fun 3D flip stunts to explore and fashionable LED lights for when you’re good enough to try a night flight.

 

Top Kid Drones (Part I)

Your kids will love these drones.

If you’re a parent reading this, we believe your kids have seen your costly camera drone in action and want to fly it themselves. And correctly, you’re possibly worried about giving over the controls of your pride and joy to a child. Luckily the best drones for kids have lots of great features in a littler, more affordable and, most notably safer-to-fly packages.

Kids drones are some of the inexpensive things on the market and as such only focus on a couple of chief features as opposed to the bells and whistles of more high-end models like the DJI Mavic Air. But, this makes them perfect for 1st-time flyers.

In this article, you’ll see which one’s are the best kid drones in terms of performance, safety, and features. You can make the best choice for your child.

BEST KIDS DRONES

When first studying to pilot a drone, your kid’s needs will be fundamental. With that being said, there are a few basics that can truly aid novice pilots: built-in stabilization is good for steadier flights and greater flying confidence, and single button take-off and landing takes care of two tricky maneuvers. Several drones at this level also have altitude hold mode, which helps the drone stay in the air even if you let go of the controls.

You’ll get the top balance of performance and features with the

Altair AA108

The drone has lots of features to help beginners develop, including three flight skill levels and the Altitude Hold mode. The wide-angle camera means children can begin honing their aerial photography skills.

HOW TO CHOOSE THE BEST KIDS DRONE

Not all drones for kids are made equal. So, it’s smart to consider a couple of key points before purchasing one. For starters, will your child be flying at home or in the park? If so, you’ll need something a tad bigger, more stable and more powerful so playtime doesn’t end early because of a gust of wind.